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Daniel's Job Description

Members of Parliament do not have a job description as such. Indeed, being an MP is very much not a nine-to-five job and takes up many evenings and weekends as well as weekdays. MPs in effect write their own job descriptions and are accountable to their Constituents, who can choose not to re-elect them at the next General Election if they do not believe their MP is doing a good enough job for them. (Each MP does also have to be re-selected by their local political party before each election, so has to do a good enough job to satisfy them as well.)

Although there is no job description, MPs are bound by a Code of Conduct throughout their public working life.

Members of Parliament do not have a job description as such. Indeed, being an MP is very much not a nine-to-five job and takes up many evenings and weekends as well as weekdays. MPs in effect write their own job descriptions and are accountable to their Constituents, who can choose not to re-elect them at the next General Election if they do not believe their MP is doing a good enough job for them. (Each MP does also have to be re-selected by their local political party before each election, so has to do a good enough job to satisfy them as well.) Although there is no job description, MPs are bound by a Code of Conduct throughout their public working life.

EXTRACT FROM THE CODE OF CONDUCT FOR MPS PUBLIC DUTIES OF MEMBERS

•By virtue of the oath, or affirmation, of allegiance taken by all Members when they are elected to the House, Members have a duty to be faithful and bear true allegiance to Her Majesty the Queen, her heirs and successors, according to law.

•Members have a duty to uphold the law, including the general law against discrimination, and to act on all occasions in accordance with the public trust placed in them.

•Members have a general duty to act in the interests of the nation as a whole; and a special duty to their constituents.

GENERAL PRINCIPLES OF CONDUCT

In carrying out their parliamentary and public duties, Members will be expected to observe the following general principles of conduct identified as applying to 'holders of public office'. Selflessness Holders of public office should take decisions solely in terms of the public interest. They should not do so in order to gain financial or other material benefits for themselves, their family, or their friends. Integrity Holders of public office should not place themselves under any financial or other obligation to outside individuals or organisations that might influence them in the performance of their official duties. Objectivity In carrying out public business, including making public appointments, awarding contracts, or recommending individuals for rewards and benefits, holders of public office should make choices on merit. Accountability Holders of public office are accountable for their decisions and actions to the public and must submit themselves to whatever scrutiny is appropriate to their office. Openness Holders of public office should be as open as possible about all the decisions and actions that they take. They should give reasons for their decisions and restrict information only when the wider public interest clearly demands. Honesty Holders of public office have a duty to declare any private interests relating to their public duties and to take steps to resolve any conflicts arising in a way that protects the public interest. Leadership Holders of public office should promote and support these principles by leadership and example.

RULES OF CONDUCT

Members are expected in particular to observe the following rules. Members shall base their conduct on a consideration of the public interest, avoid conflict between personal interest and the public interest and resolve any conflict between the two, at once, and in favour of the public interest. No Member shall act as a paid advocate in any proceeding of the House. The acceptance by a Member of a bribe to influence his or her conduct as a Member, including any fee, compensation or reward in connection with the promotion of, or opposition to, any Bill, Motion, or other matter submitted, or intended to be submitted to the House, or to any Committee of the House, is contrary to the law of Parliament. In any activities with, or on behalf of, an organisation with which a Member has a financial relationship, including activities which may not be a matter of public record such as informal meetings and functions, he or she must always bear in mind the need to be open and frank with Ministers, Members and officials. Members must bear in mind that information which they receive in confidence in the course of their parliamentary duties should be used only in connection with those duties, and that such information must never be used for the purpose of financial gain. Members shall at all times ensure that their use of expenses, allowances, facilities and services provided from the public purse is strictly in accordance with the rules laid down on these matters, and that they observe any limits placed by the House on the use of such expenses, allowances, facilities and services. Members shall at all times conduct themselves in a manner which will tend to maintain and strengthen the public's trust and confidence in the integrity of Parliament and never undertake any action which would bring the House of Commons, or its Members generally, into disrepute.